Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 4th Global Acupuncture and Therapists Annual Meeting Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Acupuncture 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Theresa Dale photo
Biography:

To determine if homeopathy and specific homeopathic formulas could help women’s hormonal symptoms, reactivate the HPA axis communication thus producing normal hormone levels and if so, to what degree would it be effective. Homeopathy is a 200 year old proven and FDA approved method for curing disease. Individual ingredients in the formulas are listed as OTC in the Homeopathic Pharmacopia of the United States meaning that they are proven effective. The Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States (HPUS) is the official compendium for Homeopathic Drugs in the USA. Female patients were in the following phases of their life: cycling with PMS, premenopausal and postmenopausal, including women with partial or complete hysterectomies. 60% or more of the patients were using or had used some type of HRT in the last 3 years; DHEA or pregnenolone, herbal therapy, cortisone or other types of medication, birth control pills, or IUD’s which secrete birth control hormones. Approximately 40% of patients were not using or were not aware of exposure to or used HRT in their lifetime. Using a 24-hour circadian salivary testing with specific testing times, thousands of saliva tests were submitted by patients/clients of health providers directly to independent CLIA licensed laboratories. The factors used in the analysis of hormonal ratios on each individual test result included age, medical history of surgical procedures such as partial and/or complete hysterectomies, genetic information, diet, exercise (lifestyle), medication usage, including any type of hormone replacement usage (HRT and BHRT).

Abstract:

To determine if homeopathy and specific homeopathic formulas could help women’s hormonal symptoms, reactivate the HPA axis communication thus producing normal hormone levels and if

so, to what degree would it be effective. Homeopathy is a 200 year old proven and FDA approved method for curing disease. Individual ingredients in the formulas are listed as OTC in the Homeopathic Pharmacopia of the United States meaning that they are proven effective. The Homeopathic Pharmacopoeia of the United States (HPUS) is the official compendium for Homeopathic Drugs in the USA. Female patients were in the following phases of their life: cycling with PMS, premenopausal and postmenopausal, including women with partial or complete hysterectomies. 60% or more of the patients were using or had used some type of HRT in the last 3 years; DHEA or pregnenolone, herbal therapy, cortisone or other types of medication, birth control pills, or IUD’s which secrete birth control hormones. Approximately 40% of patients were not using or were not aware of exposure to or used HRT in their lifetime. Using a 24-hour circadian salivary testing with specific testing times, thousands of saliva tests were submitted by patients/clients of health providers directly to independent CLIA licensed laboratories. The factors used in the analysis of hormonal ratios on each individual test result included age, medical history of surgical procedures such as partial and/or complete hysterectomies, genetic information, diet, exercise (lifestyle), medication usage, including any type of hormone replacement usage (HRT and BHRT).

OMICS International Acupuncture 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jennifer Brett photo
Biography:

Jennifer Brett, ND, Lac, is the Founding Director of the UB Acupuncture Institute. She graduated in 1987 from the National College of Naturopathic Medicine and graduated in 1988 from the Tri-State College of Acupuncture. She is currently the Chair of two Council of Colleges of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine (CCAOM) Committees (CCAOM Distance Learning Committee and CCAOM Research Committee) and a member of the ACCAHC (Academic Consortium for Complementary and Alternative Health Care) Clinical Working Group.

Abstract:

Although classical East Asian medicine has a history of several millennia, with attendant cultural variations, in the twentieth century the People’s Republic of China developed a standardized self-limited approach known as “Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)”. This modern interpretation of the classical medical tradition embraced theories and methods that are amenable to a Western scientific and anatomical view of the body and its mechanisms while rejecting the more esoteric and mystico-religious aspects of the traditional approaches. Modern TCM has been practiced in the PRC since 1953 with a corpus of data recording its treatment efficacy within western medical diagnostic parameters. The rise of inter-professional education/clinics (IPE/C) coincides with the era of the rise of the idea of healthcare teams in medical education and delivery. US patients increasingly self-choose services of a team of community CAM and conventional medical providers as their choice for care. Hospitals and health centers are adding CAM professionals to teams. The UB Integrated Clinics model delivering interdisciplinary patient centered care will be described in this. She will identify critical teaching and care competencies that have been utilized at the University of Bridgeport, emphasizing the role of TCM in integration of acupuncture into a team care model. The presenter will explore how a model of team-based care that includes TCM at the University of Bridgeport’s teaching clinic helps interns learn to work together for optimal patient care and discuss examples of strategies for inter-professional clinical collaboration in teaching clinics.

Keynote Forum

Jingcheng Dong

University of Bridgeport, USA

Keynote: Philosophical thinking of Chinese traditional medicine

Time : 11:25 AM

OMICS International Acupuncture 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jingcheng Dong photo
Biography:

Chinese Traditional Medicine (CTM) is the general appellation of all the traditional medicines of different nationalities in China, which share great similarities of basic concept and philosophical basis, and conform to the development regulation of empirical medicine, among which medicine of Han nationality (Han medicine) is the most mature. The development of CTM is totally different from modern western medicine, always revolving around the center of disease diagnosis and treatment, establishing the core theoretical system of “Yin and Yang”, “five elements”, “Viscera” and “Humoralism” with the theoretical foundation of ancient Chinese philosophy, which represents the highest achievement of worldwide empirical medicine and philosophy form at that time. In general, basic structure of CTM mainly consists of three parts as following: the part which shares consensus of modern medicine, the part which is unconsciously ahead of modern medicine, and the part which needs to be recognized or abandoned

Abstract:

Although classical East Asian medicine has a history of several millennia, with attendant cultural variations, in the twentieth century the People’s Republic of China developed a standardized self-limited approach known as “Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM)”. This modern interpretation of the classical medical tradition embraced theories and methods that are amenable to a Western scientific and anatomical view of the body and its mechanisms while rejecting the more esoteric and mystico-religious aspects of the traditional approaches. Modern TCM has been practiced in the PRC since 1953 with a corpus of data recording its treatment efficacy within western medical diagnostic parameters. The rise of inter-professional education/clinics (IPE/C) coincides with the era of the rise of the idea of healthcare teams in medical education and delivery. US patients increasingly self-choose services of a team of community CAM and conventional medical providers as their choice for care. Hospitals and health centers are adding CAM professionals to teams. The UB Integrated Clinics model delivering interdisciplinary patient centered care will be described in this. She will identify critical teaching and care competencies that have been utilized at the University of Bridgeport, emphasizing the role of TCM in integration of acupuncture into a team care model. The presenter will explore how a model of team-based care that includes TCM at the University of Bridgeport’s teaching clinic helps interns learn to work together for optimal patient care and discuss examples of strategies for inter-professional clinical collaboration in teaching clinics.